Cohos Trail Sign and BlazeHOW LONG IS THE COHOS TRAIL?

The Cohos Trail is 170-miles long (or more depending on various side spurs).  It runs from Harts Location at Notchland in southern Crawford Notch to the Canadian border at Fourth Connecticut Lake high on Prospect Hill.

IS THE TRAIL DIFFICULT?

Yes and No! The Cohos Trail can be difficult in places, largely because it is lengthy and, in many places, very isolated. There are few supply stops. There are a number of shelters, but one must carry a tent for about half the overnights on the trail. Therefore, The Cohos Trail is not for everyone. You need above average woods and outdoor skills, and good physical condition and health to make a go of it. You need to carry a very well thought-out pack, and, if you are a through-hiker, you’ll need to ship caches ahead to several locations. However, many features along the trail can be visited easily in an hour or two, so great day hikes are possible.

The Cohos Trail is no less than 170 miles long. Conditions on the trail can range from the high heat of summer to Arctic chill in the spring and fall. It can snow above 4,000 feet elevation at any time of year, literally. So you must come prepared to meet the challenges of a broad range of weather conditions.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO THROUGH-HIKE THE TRAIL?

Hikers have completed the trail in as little as nine days. Some take two weeks. Most do not complete the trail all at once but walk it in stages or sections.

WHO CREATED THE COHOS TRAIL?

The Cohos Trail was first conceived by Kim Robert Nilsen of Spofford, NH and developed by a small all-volunteer organization– The Cohos Trail Association (TCTA). Many of its volunteers, officers, and board members hail from Coos County, NH (in the far north). It has been built by volunteers near and far, by students in the North Country Trailmaster program, by high school students, Eagle Scouts, Americorps workers, several highly skilled cutters from the woods industry, elderly citizens, even children. People from all the states in the Northeast and from states as far away as Texas have spent time maintaining the trail.

HOW DO YOU PRONOUNCE COHOS ANYWAY?

It is pronounced coeahss.

HOW CAN I FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE COHOS TRAIL?

Look through this website thoroughly. It will inform you about great sections of the trail, about day hikes, and about how to get there. It will inform you where you may camp, how to keep from getting lost, what lodging is available and where, and even where to obtain shuttle service. It will show you about how you might join the TCTA, how you can help and volunteer, where you can purchase maps, guidebooks, and other products, and how you can support this vast effort in other ways.

FRIENDS OF THE COHOS TRAIL ON FACEBOOK

Be sure to check out our Facebook Group, Friends of the Cohos Trail. We post there almost daily. If things are going on, they are going on on that Friends page. You may meet people there and post information or questions about the trail.

A WILD PLACE

Fall Blueberry

Remember, The Cohos Trail is a wild trail in a million acres of mountains and forests. It’s for those who really, really want to get away from it all. It’s a trail where you can test yourself, and a trail where you can find real solace, the sort of peace you might have experienced had you arrived here 1,000 years ago.

 

WELL THEN, WELCOME

We want to welcome you to our favorite place in the whole world, The Great North Woods of New Hampshire’s far-flung Coos County. We hope you enjoy this place we call home as much as we do. Leave your world behind and enjoy the peace and solitude of the trail and the occasional chat with a moose.

The Cohos Trail Association
PO Box 82
Lancaster, NH 03584
603-246-7784

cohos@cohostrail.org